WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Washington Teachers Union Elects Elizabeth Davis As President

Play associated audio

D.C. teachers have elected a new president: Elizabeth Davis, who has promised to more aggressively represent them with D.C. Public Schools management.

Davis won 55 percent of the vote in the Washington Teachers Union elections, beating out Nathan Saunders. She's worked as a teacher for 39 years in seven D.C. schools and has been a long-time union activist.

Davis says teachers have told her they want the union to be more actively involved in issues around education reform. She says the recent school closings were a missed opportunity.

"They wanted to see the union support communities to stop the school closings to keep neighborhood schools," Davis says. "But our union was silent on the issue. Public schools closing down, charters opening. We're losing teachers and students to charters."

Saunders ran three years ago on a similar platform, but when in office toned down his rhetoric and became far less fiery. Saunders attributed his loss to dealing with "a very sensitive community of teachers during a very challenging time."

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

Judges To Decide Whether Virginia District Map Illegally Clusters Black Voters

A panel of federal judges in Alexandria is weighing whether the Virginia House of Delegates illegally grouped black voters into certain legislative districts.
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.