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Education Reform Clears Way For Takeover Of Troubled Alexandria School

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Leaders in Alexandria are bracing for a takeover of the region's most troubled school.

Jefferson-Houston School in Alexandria has failed to meet accreditation standards 10 out of the last 11 years. State leaders call it a failing school, and now a new bill signed by Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell sets the state for a takeover of the school.

"I question the constitutionality of the legislation," says state Senator Adam Ebbin.

He says it may be unconstitutional for the state to seize control of a local school.

"This has never been done before," Ebbin says. "There's never been this kind of school division before. We are in uncharted territory."

Del. Rob Krupicka says exact details of how the takeover would work are yet to be worked out.

"The teachers would still need to be employees of somewhere," Krupicka says. "They could turn the teachers into employees somewhere else but they could also keep them as employees of ACPS so that they don't have to set up a separate payroll system."

The clock is ticking. As it now stands, the takeover is scheduled to happen a year from now.

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