Sandwich Monday: The Famous St. Paul Sandwich (of St. Louis) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Sandwich Monday: The Famous St. Paul Sandwich (of St. Louis)

Since Sandwich Monday began, certain sandwiches have been our white whales: the Hippogriff Burger, a Reuben signed by J.D. Salinger, an Actual White Whale sandwich. Also, the mysterious St.Paul sandwich, native to St. Louis: It's an egg foo young patty, with lettuce, pickle and mayo, on white bread. But we finally caught one.

Miles: This is the same sandwich my Model U.N. group made the first time we all got high together.

Ian: This really comes from the "These Are The Only Things I Had In My Fridge" school of cooking.

Miles picked a couple up from Delmar Chop Suey in St. Louis. They are amazingly cheap, and shockingly delicious.

Ian: It's really good. I haven't been this surprised by a sandwich since I closed my medicine cabinet and saw a grilled cheese standing behind me in the mirror.

Miles: They coat the sandwich in mayonnaise so it slides down your throat before you can process what it tastes like.

Peter: You know how this got its name? St. Louis fixed himself an egg foo young sandwich, and somebody asked him, "Who made that monstrosity?"

Robert: I always wondered how St. Paul got to be the patron saint of defibrillators.

Ian: I really prefer this to the St. Pauli Sandwich, which is always like "Ian, my bread is UP HERE."

Miles: This sandwich makes me think we've been mispronouncing "Missouri." Are we sure it's not supposed to be "misery"?

[The verdict: truly, shockingly tasty. We fully expected to be grossed out by this thing, but it's amazing. And cheap.]

Sandwich Monday is a satirical feature from the humorists at Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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