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Prosecutors Link Pfc. Manning's Leaks To Al-Qaida

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Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., after the third day of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., after the third day of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks.

A military judge is allowing prosecutors to argue Army Pfc. Bradley Manning used a most wanted list compiled by WikiLeaks as a guide for leaking classified information.

The "Most Wanted Leaks of 2009'' was admitted as evidence Monday in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort Meade, near Baltimore, according to the Associated Press.

The judge ruled the list is relevant to the government's most serious charge that Manning aided the enemy by causing intelligence to be published on the WikiLeaks website. Prosecutors are trying to prove the information Manning leaked helped al-Qaida.

The most wanted list included a request for documents about detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Manning has acknowledged sending WikiLeaks a file containing Guantanamo detainee records in March 2010.

He says he leaked the documents of his own accord and didn't consider them a national security risk.

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