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Majority Of Riders Give Metro Positive Ratings, Poll Finds

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Metro has maintained favorable ratings with the majority of riders, despite some loud critics.
Evan Leeson: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ecstaticist/6332860492/
Metro has maintained favorable ratings with the majority of riders, despite some loud critics.

Despite all its problems, a majority of District-area residents have a favorable view of Metro, according to a Washington Post poll.

Sleepy-faced commuters quietly waited for their Red Line train this morning, but when asked them about what they think of Metro, their Monday fog couldn't stop them from sharing their opinions.

"Well, I rely on Metro, so I like it. Although, I am a little frustrated sometimes recently," said one rider. "About delays, on the Red Line, and the track work."

The Washington Post poll found 71 percent of rail riders rate Metro service as good or excellent, while 16 percent say it's not so good or poor. But the survey also found a growing number of people say the subway is becoming too expensive to ride, and more people say they are not using Metro because trains are too crowded or rides take too long. Other riders say the weekends are the worst.

"Forget it on the weekends, it's useless," said another rider. "But they are working toward a better future for the system as a whole."

A better future could be years away. Major track work is expected to continue until at least 2017.

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