EU Officials Question Kerry On 'Unacceptable' Spying Claims | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

EU Officials Question Kerry On 'Unacceptable' Spying Claims

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is hearing from European allies who are upset with recent reports that the U.S. has spied on its friends. The European Union's top diplomat asked Kerry about the reports at a security conference Monday. Other officials say the case could derail talks on free trade.

Allegations that the U.S. had spied on EU offices in Washington, D.C., and New York emerged this weekend, after a report in Germany's Der Spiegel, which attributed the information to secret documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

From Brussels, NPR's Teri Schultz filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"EU Foreign Policy Chief Catherine Ashton made clear to Secretary Kerry the bloc's concerns over allegations the U.S. has been spying on it. Kerry said he wasn't aware of the issue but would look into the claims and get back to Ashton.

"Meanwhile, new security sweeps are being conducted on EU buildings that were reportedly bugged in Brussels, Washington and New York.

"European governments are calling in U.S. ambassadors, says EU spokeswoman Pia Ahrenkilde Hansen, to press home the message: 'Clarity and transparency is what we expect from our partners and allies, and that is what we expect from the United States.'

"German Chancellor Angela Merkel says, 'Bugging friends is unacceptable.'

"French President Francois Hollande said if it is happening, the spying must stop immediately."

As The Two-Way reported Sunday, European Parliament President Martin Schulz issued a statement saying he is "deeply worried and shocked about the allegations of U.S. authorities spying on EU offices," and demanding "full clarification."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Typewriters, Underwater Hotels And Picture Phones: The Future, As Seen From 1964

The 1964 World's Fair showcased jet packs and other miracles of science. Here's how people back then thought the future would look (and how it actually turned out).
NPR

No. 1 Most Expensive Coffee Comes From Elephant's No. 2

A coffee entrepreneur claims his brew is different — and better — than the trendy civet poop coffee. And it starts with the idea that elephants, unlike humans or civets, are herbivores.
WAMU 88.5

Maureen McDonnell Didn't Give Special Treatment To Star Scientific, Witness Testifies

A defense witness in the corruption trail against former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, says the former first lady often traveled the state promoting state businesses, countering the notion she gave special treatment to the company at the heart of the corruption trial.
NPR

The Momentum Of The Ice Bucket Challenge — And What It Means For ALS

A recent fundraising challenge has gone viral on social media, calling attention to research into Lou Gehrig's disease. Forbes contributor Dan Diamond discusses the state of that research.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.