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Bill Haas Wins AT&T National

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Bill Haas won this year's AT&T National golf tournament at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda.

Haas's victory never seemed in doubt during the final round, as he shot a five under par 66 to win by three shots. Three consecutive birdies in the middle of his round sealed the win.

"Boy, I'm speechless," he said. "This is amazing. Thank you very much."

The size of the crowd during the final round this year didn't approach last year's that witnessed tournament host Tiger Woods' thrilling victory. Woods sat out this year with an elbow injury, and several other big names also skipped the event.

Rain also wrecked havoc on the tournament, forcing yesterday's final round to start almost three hours early so golfers could finish before storms hit the area.

Those who did attend not only saw Haas's victory, but the antics of Korean golfer D.H. Lee. He finished tied for third, but during Saturday's third round, he told some fans they were number one. After receiving some jeers for a bad shot on the 12th hole, cameras showed Lee saluting fans with his middle finger.

Whether this is the last AT&T National at Congressional is yet to be seen. Club members will vote later this year on whether to invite the tournament back for a 6th time.

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