WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Rusty The Red Panda Used Tree Limbs To Escape

Play associated audio
Rusty made it all the way from the National Zoo to Adams Morgan before being caught.
National Zoo
Rusty made it all the way from the National Zoo to Adams Morgan before being caught.

National Zoo officials believe rain allowed Rusty to escape from what was thought to be a secure enclosure. That rain lowered tree limbs in the red panda exhibit, meaning Rusty could get closer to the edge of the enclosure. It also caused bamboo just outside the enclosure to bend over, creating a bridge perfect for Rusty's escape.

The escape produced tense drama and a search that spanned two neighborhoods, before the red panda was finally found running about in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of northwest D.C.

To ensure Rusty and his exhibit mate, Shama, stay at the zoo, staff are trimming trees and cutting bamboo in and around the exhibit. They also plan to replace plants in the upper portion of the enclosure with a visitor barrier, which will add 30 more inches of tree-free space.

Zoo officials say Rusty is in good health and expect him to be back in his exhibit by July 4.

NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

Is Trump's Call For 'Law And Order' A Coded Racial Message?

Donald Trump's promise to be the "law-and-order" candidate revived a slogan often associated with Nixon's 1968 presidential campaign. Linguist Geoff Nunberg discusses the term's racial underpinings
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.