Supreme Court's Ruling Doesn't Affect Virginia's Gay Marriage Ban | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Supreme Court's Ruling Doesn't Affect Virginia's Gay Marriage Ban

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The Attorney General's office in Virginia says it will defend the state's constitution, which defines marriage as the union between one man and one woman. But with the ACLU fighting that decision, it could be a lengthy battle.

The ACLU's Rebecca Glenberg agrees that this victory for gay rights advocates is not an end to the struggle for marriage equality, and the ACLU's lobbying arm will take this fight to Virginia lawmakers.

"I'm not going to discuss specifics of our strategy at this point but certainly we would advocate for the General Assembly to take steps to repeal Virginia's repressive marriage law and constitutional amendment," says Glenberg.

But the Family Foundation's Chris Freund says the justices were deliberately not too broad in their interpretation of the law.

"They went to the Supreme Court, asked the court to find a constitutional right to marriage and impose that decision on 50 states, and the court did not do what same-sex marriage advocates asked them to do," she says.

Freund knows attorneys on both sides will be mulling over the more complex details, but for now, the interpretation is that federal benefits are extended to couples in states where same-sex marriage is recognized.

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