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Former Pro Boxer Keely Thompson Pleads Guilty To Wire Fraud

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Former professional boxer Keely Thompson admitted in federal court he pocketed more than $200,000 in grant money money that he promised to spend on training the city's next generation of boxers, but instead, squandered it on cruise ships, fancy meals and gambling trips to Atlantic City.

The beloved boxing figure, who once ran a gym in Columbia Heights, received more than a $1.5 million in grant money from the D.C. Council and other public and private foundations over the years. Indicted back in 2010, Thompson struck a deal with prosecutors, pleading guilty to one felony count of wire fraud.

"He's accepted responsibility, and we are moving on, says Thompson's lawyer Troy W. Poole. "He still continues to help people and provide leadership and mentorship to the kids — the very kids that were in his boxing center that still call him today, that still believe in him, that still trust in him."

As part of the plea deal, the charges against Thompson's wife were dismissed, and he's promised to cooperate with federal prosecutors, who are engaged in a wide-ranging corruption investigation into the D.C. government.

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