WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Cuccinelli Asks Supreme Court To Void Lower Court Ruling On Anti-Sodomy Law

Play associated audio

Virginia's Attorney General is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a lower court's ruling that struck down the commonwealth's anti-sodomy law.

In a petition filed Tuesday, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli claims the three-judge panel of the Fourth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals misinterpreted the scope of a Supreme Court decision that invalidated a similar Texas law.

The attorney general's office argues the landmark Supreme Court's landmark Lawrence v. Texas decisions applied only to sex acts involving adults, not those between an adult and a minor.

Rusty McGuire, the commonwealth's Attorney for Louisa County, says the Virginia anti-sodomy law is the foundation of how his office prosecutes child sex predators.

"The way laws are written, they don't always write out every text, every little letter. They refer to other code sections. If you look at the code section for internet solicitation, it says solicitation in violation of 18.2-3-61. If it is unconstitutional, you can't go after Internet predators either," he says.

The attorney general's petition argues that it the appeals court decision is not reversed, nearly 90 people may be eligible to have their names removed from Virginia's sex offender registry.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.