Case Against Maryland 'Joker' For Threatening To Shoot Workers Dismissed | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Case Against Maryland 'Joker' For Threatening To Shoot Workers Dismissed

Police recovered a cache of guns from Prescott's house, though they were all acquired legally.
Prince George's County Police Department
Police recovered a cache of guns from Prescott's house, though they were all acquired legally.

The case against a Maryland man accused of calling himself a "joker'' while phoning in a threat to his workplace last year was dismissed by a judge this afternoon.

Neil Prescott was charged with one count of telephone misuse. He was accused of threatening to load his guns and shoot up his workplace, only days after a shooting rampage at the opening night of a "Batman" movie in Colorado where 12 people were killed.

In the wake of Prescott's arrest, police recovered about two dozen weapons and ammunition in his Crofton apartment. Authorities say all of his firearms were legally purchased.

But a Prince George's County judge today dismissed the case against Prescott, agreeing with a defense lawyer's argument that the court documents charging Prescott were "defective'' and unfairly vague in describing the allegations.

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