Twinkies, Ho Hos, Other Hostess Cakes To Return On July 15 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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    Twinkies, Ho Hos, Other Hostess Cakes To Return On July 15

    According to the countdown clock, at 2 p.m. ET Monday we were just 490 hours away from fresh Twinkies.

    As the Los Angeles Times says, it's "time to welcome back the Twinkie. ... Hostess is bringing back its popular snack cakes on July 15 after going bankrupt last year and selling its brands to various bidders."

    The snack saviors (via Bloomberg News):

    "Hostess is owned by Apollo Global Management LLC (APO) and C. Dean Metropoulos & Co., whose combined offer of as much as $410 million for company's snack-cake enterprise was the only one submitted during the bankruptcy process in March. The spongy yellow cakes went out of production, prompting bidding wars for boxes on auction sites like EBay.

    "Other Hostess products include CupCakes, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos."

    This means our friends at The Salt can plan for updates to this popular post:

    Wear 'Em, Chuck 'Em, Float 'Em: 10 Things To Do With Twinkies

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