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    Twinkies, Ho Hos, Other Hostess Cakes To Return On July 15

    According to the countdown clock, at 2 p.m. ET Monday we were just 490 hours away from fresh Twinkies.

    As the Los Angeles Times says, it's "time to welcome back the Twinkie. ... Hostess is bringing back its popular snack cakes on July 15 after going bankrupt last year and selling its brands to various bidders."

    The snack saviors (via Bloomberg News):

    "Hostess is owned by Apollo Global Management LLC (APO) and C. Dean Metropoulos & Co., whose combined offer of as much as $410 million for company's snack-cake enterprise was the only one submitted during the bankruptcy process in March. The spongy yellow cakes went out of production, prompting bidding wars for boxes on auction sites like EBay.

    "Other Hostess products include CupCakes, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos."

    This means our friends at The Salt can plan for updates to this popular post:

    Wear 'Em, Chuck 'Em, Float 'Em: 10 Things To Do With Twinkies

    Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    NPR

    Robert Irwin Brings 'Big' To Texas With Permanent Art Installation

    The 87-year-old conceptual artist unveils a large-scale installation of his work in Marfa, Texas, this week. He's spent his career creating site-specific art that often treats light as its subject.
    NPR

    Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

    Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
    NPR

    Post Republican Convention Wrap-Up: Did The Party Make Progress On Unity?

    The Republican National Convention wrapped up on Thursday. Ron Elving was there, and tells NPR's Scott Simon about the ups and downs of the four day meeting.
    NPR

    Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

    Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

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