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Sandwich Monday: Zombie Burger

It's a testament to the food at Zombie Burger that it's named the place after a species best known for eating human brains — and yet, still trusts that you'll keep your appetite.

The entire menu at the Des Moines, Iowa, burger joint is zombie-themed. There's the "T-Virus," the "Undead Elvis," the "Dead Moines." The star, though, is "The Walking Ched." It's topped with macaroni and cheese, and the bun has been replaced with breaded and deep-fried macaroni and cheese patties, which may be beating an undead horse a bit. I tried one with friends Anton & Todd.

Ian: The mac n' cheese really works with the whole zombie thing, because it looks like brains.

Anton: I feel like I'm eating Zombie Mayor McCheese.

We also tried the timely "World War B" burger. The B stands for bacon, but if you like your sandwiches handsome, you can imagine it stands for Brad Pitt. It's a burger topped with six strips of bacon, pulled bacon, and bacon mayonnaise. Bacon bacon bacon; bacon bacon.

Todd: The bacon really brings out the flavor of the other bacon.

Ian: They always say there's more pigs than people in Iowa, but I'm guessing things evened out a bit when they made this sandwich.

Off-topic Zombie: ... braaaaaains ...

[The verdict: highly recommended. Until sampling the menu here, I'd never stopped to think how boring the culinary life of a zombie must be. Sure, you're probably really excited about brains the first couple times you eat them, but after that it's like, "brains again?" Zombie Burger makes you glad to be human.]

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