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In Virginia, Cicadas Make Noise And Damage Trees

This year's noisy crop of cicadas is now busy laying eggs, and that's causing widespread damage to trees in Virginia.

Virginia forestry officials say the damage is the result of cicada females laying eggs in the thin-barked outer branches of trees and shrubs. The females slice into the branch, then deposit up to 80 eggs.

Forest health specialist Chris Asaro says a single female can create about 30 nests, laying as many as 600 eggs. The nesting can cause structural damage known as "flagging," which is visible across much of the state's Piedmont and coastal plain.

The department says the good news is that most medium to large trees won't suffer any serious long-term damage. And better yet, the next cicada outbreak won't occur for 17 years.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

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