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Analysis: More Charges Take Place In Ongoing D.C. Corruption Investigation

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There was a guilty plea this week, as well as more charges in the ongoing investigation into corruption in the District. Meanwhile, Metro officials say Silver Line construction is on schedule despite some reports to the contrary, and the Silver Line emerges as an issue in Virginia's governor's race. Washington Post columnist Robert McCartney talks about the latest developments in these stories.

On whether the D.C. corruption campaign is moving closer to Mayor Vincent Gray: "The focus right now is on trying to build a case against top city contractor and political power broker Jeffrey Thompson. He is the guy allegedly behind the $650,000 shadow campaign that helped elect Mayor Vincent Gray in 2010. Yesterday was a big day — there was both a guilty plea by one of Jeffrey Thompson's former employees, plus new charges against a second former employee... Court documents say this went on for 10 years, and many candidates benefitted. They include Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, former Mayor Adrian Fenty, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, and numerous D.C. council members."

On whether the opening for Metro's Silver Line extension to Dulles Airport will be delayed: "The Washington Metropolitan Airports Authority is pushing back against the idea that the opening of the first leg of the Silver Line could be delayed until early next year, but it is not ruling out that it could be delayed either. The authority is building this new Metro rail line, and it's supposed to hand it over to the Metro transit system to run in September, and then open it to the public in December."

On the Silver Line popping up in the Virginia governor's race this week: "Democrat Terry McAuliffe has been trying to drum up support, especially in northern Virginia, by pointing out his appointment, Ken Cuccinelli, the Republican, opposed building the Silver Line. Cuccinelli has responded mainly by suggesting that McAuliffe would have wasted taxpayers' money in the process."

Listen to the full analysis here.

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