Prosecutors Say That Tweets Prove That Manning Conspired With WikiLeaks | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Prosecutors Say That Tweets Prove That Manning Conspired With WikiLeaks

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Manning's trial for leaking secret documents to WikiLeaks resumes next week.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Manning's trial for leaking secret documents to WikiLeaks resumes next week.

In Ft. Meade, Md., social media website Twitter is now a point of discussion in the court martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.

Government prosecutors say tweets allegedly sent to Manning suggest the former intelligence analyst conspired with Wikileaks administrators to release secret government documents. The messages sent by Wikileaks in May of 2010 asked for the military's global email address list and a copy of a web page from the Internet site Archive.org.

Mark Mander, a government computer analyst testified the tweets were authentic, according to copies of the tweets he retrieved from a Google archive site.

But defense attorney Captain Joshua Tooman disagreed, arguing the messages were gathered indirectly through Google instead of directly from Wikileaks account, or from Twitter. Tooman said the unverified tweets were not seen by his client and cannot be used to explain Manning's motivation.

Defense attorneys have presented a motion to disallow the evidence, along with portions of testimony from 17 other witnesses. Yesterday, Judge Denise Lind recessed the trial until next week to give attorneys on both sides an opportunity to negotiate what can be entered into evidence.

The judge will hold a status hearing next Tuesday, and the trial is scheduled to resume one week from today.

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