WAMU 88.5 : News

D.C. Worker Charged With Policing City Officials Fails To Disclose Second Job

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For years, D.C.'s Office of Campaign Finance made sure city lawmakers and employees followed the District's ethics laws and filled out conflict-of-interest statements. But one city worker that plays a large role in policing the city's candidates and elected officials has a conflict of his own—one that he didn't disclose.

William Sanford is general counsel for the Office of Campaign Finance, the District's election watchdog. He's also, it turns out, a lawyer with an active practice in Silver Spring, Maryland, a fact he didn't include in the conflict-of-interest form submitted submitted for 2012.

A spokesperson for the city agency says it was an oversight.

D.C. tightened its disclosure requirements last year after numerous scandals involving lawmakers. Now officials must disclose all business relationships, regardless of whether a company is doing business with the District.

The spokesperson says after WAMU 88.5 contacted the agency office, Sanford amended his conflict-of-interest form.

The office of campaign finance, which has been criticized for its lack of oversight during the recent controversies involving city lawmakers, turned over responsibility for monitoring conflict-of-interest statements to a new agency, the Board of Ethics and Government Accountability, last year.

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