British Leader: Trendsetter, Or A Bit Too Casual? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

British Leader: Trendsetter, Or A Bit Too Casual?

British Prime Minister David Cameron is sometimes picked on for his privileged background, and at the Group of Eight summit in Northern Ireland, he sought to go casual.

Not only did he ditch the tie, as did other leaders, Cameron also shed his jacket and even rolled up his sleeves.

Not everyone was won over.

As columnist Michael Deacon of The Telegraph put it: "A crucial early victory for David Cameron at the G8 summit in Northern Ireland, as he comfortably outdid his counterparts in the all-important Unconvincing Attempt to Look Relaxed."

Cameron later appeared with a jacket, but he had already drawn attention to himself by this point.

As the BBC noted: "Many people might say the forced informality makes for uncomfortable viewing. A man in a dark suit and white shirt with no tie does not inherently look relaxed and informal. He just looks like a man who forgot his tie because he overslept."

As our slideshow shows, previous G-8 summits haven't always been quite so informal.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Stephen Hawking Says Zayn Malik Could Still Be In One Direction In A Parallel Universe

Millions of hearts were broken last month when Zayn Malik left One Direction, but according to physicist Stephen Hawking, that might not be the case after all.
NPR

Competitive Bartender Pours Father's Wisdom Into Signature Drink

Bartender Ran Duan will represent the U.S. in a Bacardi international cocktail competition. His specialty? "Father's Advice," a stirred-not-shaken cocktail that's a testament to his hardworking dad.
NPR

Fact Check: Is The Clinton Foundation 'The Most Transparent'?

Since Hillary Clinton launched her presidential run, her family's foundation has been scrutinized. The Clintons responded, calling it the most transparent organization of its kind. But is that true?
NPR

How Tech Firms Are Helping People In The Nepal Earthquake Zone

Tech and telecom companies stepped up with much-needed services. Facebook and Google offered tools to help those in the region let family and friends know they're OK. Other firms cut calling costs.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.