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Wave Of Attacks Leaves At Least 30 Dead In Iraq

A string of deadly attacks that appeared to be coordinated car bombings and shootings killed at least 30 people and left many more wounded across Iraq on Sunday, the Associated Press reports.

The AP has more:

"Most of the car bombs hit Shiite-majority areas and were the cause of most of the casualties, killing 26. The blasts hit half a dozen cities and towns in the south and center of the country.

The blasts began when a parked car bomb went off early morning in the industrial area of the city of Kut, killing three people and wounding 14 others. That was followed by another car bomb outside the city targeted a gathering of construction workers that killed two and wounded 12, according to police."

Other attacks occurred in cities of Basra, Nasiriyah, Mahmoudiya, Najaf, Madain, Hillah and Mosul.

Violence has increased dramatically in Iraq in recent months, with nearly 2,000 killed since the start of April, according to the AP.

So far, there have been no claims of responsibility for the attacks.

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