Analysis: Developments Unravel In D.C.'s Corruption Investigation, Leggett Seeks Third Term In Montgomery County | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Analysis: Developments Unravel In D.C.'s Corruption Investigation, Leggett Seeks Third Term In Montgomery County

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A corruption investigation in the District heats back up, Virginia's Democrats select their ticket for November's election, and in Maryland, Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett says he will be running again. Washington Post columnist Robert McCartney talks about the latest developments in these stories.

On the latest development into the District's ongoing investigation into political corruption: U.S. Attorney Ron Machen just keeps plowing ahead in his crusade against D.C. government corruption. Two big things happened this week. The first is that Michael Brown plead guilty to accepting $5,500 in bribes; he's the third council member to be convicted of corruption in a year-and-a-half. The other thing that happened, and this gets kind of complicated... is that both Michael Brown and another council member, Vincent Orange, have been linked to illegal campaign contributions from the same donor who allegedly gave illicit help to Vincent Gray in his 2010 campaign. Vincent Orange has not been charged and is cooperating with investigators. The common thread here is that businessman Jeffrey Thompson, who also has not been charged, is said to be the man who has financed the $650,000 shadow campaign that supported Gray when he won the mayoralty. I think the important thing is that Machen's office seems to be trying to break up a network centered on Thompson that funneled illegal campaign donations to candidates."

On Virginia's primary ticket this November: "The Virginia Democrats and their primaries added a couple of establishment liberals to the ticket. They are state Sen. Ralph Northam from Norfolk who was nominated as lieutenant governor and state Sen. Mark Herring of Loudoun, nominated to run for attorney general in a year. In each case, a sitting legislator defeated a challenger who had not held elected office..."

On Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett seeking another term: "Leggett announced he will run for a third term. He wants to run because he's been in office during the hard times during recession, and he thinks he'd be able to make some major accomplishments now that the economy is getting stronger, and there will be more revenue. In particular, he'd like to be more visible on progress on some transportation projects, like the Purple Line and the Corridor Cities Transitway. There's another motive though, and that's sheer political competitiveness. Leggett was leaning against running, largely because his wife wanted him to retire, but he's predecessor, Doug Duncan, said he was going to run."

Listen to the full analysis here.

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