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Prosecutors Say That Helicopter Video Leaked By Manning Helped Enemy

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Manning remains on trial for leaking thousands of documents to WikiLeaks.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Manning remains on trial for leaking thousands of documents to WikiLeaks.

A witness in the court martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning claimed that a leaked video of an Apache helicopter attack in Iraq revealed information that could injure U.S. forces.

On Wednesday, Chief Warrant Officer Jon LaRue's statement was read into the record in open court, supporting government claims about the damage incurred by the release of the so-called "Collateral Murder" video. That footage, recorded from a cockpit gun camera, shows a 2007 Army helicopter attack on a group of men in Iraq. Twelve people were killed in the airstrike, including two correspondents for Reuters news service.

In his statement, LaRue, a helicopter pilot and analyst for the Pentagon, said the video shows how the craft operates, and includes details about the use of its laser gunsights, angles of engagement and how to deploy them. He went on to say that the disclosure of such tactics, techniques and procedures could help enemies anticipate Army operations and plan more effective strategies.

Later, defense attorney David Coombs won an objection when prosecutors could not produce a computer security agreement Manning allegedly signed when he deployed to Iraq in 2009. Prosecutor Ashden Fein suggested entering a sample form into evidence instead, but the judge disagreed, blocking the attempt. Government attorneys claim Manning violated that agreement in three of 22 charges against him.

Testimony resumed today in Ft. Meade, Maryland.

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