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Gun Control Debate Continues Six Months After Newtown

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Family members of victims of the Newtown shooting gathered at the Capitol to commemorate the sixth-month anniversary of the slaying.

As the names of the deceased were read, tears welled up in family members eyes. The Senate has already rejected one gun control proposal. But Maryland Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings, who lost a nephew to gun violence, says the presence of these grieving families is increasing pressure on opponents to rethink their vote.

"They will have such a driving force probably until they die because they will be constantly reminded of the pain," he says.

Cummings says gun control advocates like himself aren't giving up.

"Until such time that we have the kind of legislation, we need to make sure that kids in Newtown, kids in Baltimore... that they're protected," he says.

Majority Leader Harry Reid says it's time for the Senate to take up gun control again, but it's unclear if he can convince five senators to switch their votes going forward.

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