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Census Reports That D.C. Is Growing Younger and Whiter

Chocolate City no more.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/euthman/150285269
Chocolate City no more.

D.C.'s population is growing—and it's getting younger and whiter in the process.

A new report released by the U.S. Census found that while D.C.'s population grew from 619,020 to 632,323 residents in the year ending on July 1, 2012, the majority of that growth was in the number of white residents—from 262,041 to 271,323. At the same time, population growth among African-American or black residents was less pronounced, from 314,433 to 316,482.

The changes are part of an ongoing shift in the city's demographic makeup. While D.C. was overwhelmingly black in the 1970s—when it was known as "Chocolate City"—the proportion of African-American residents has fallen in recent years. According to the Census, African-Americans alone are now under the 50 percent mark, coming in at 48.6 percent of the population. If black Hispanic residents are added, that number rises to 50.5 percent.

Non-Hispanic whites now make up 35.5 percent of the city's population, while roughly 10 percent are Hispanic and four percent Asian. D.C. has added over 30,000 residents since 2010 and some 60,000 since 2000, the first growth in the city population in decades.

The city's population has also gotten younger. From 2010 to 2012, the median age fell from 33.8 to 33.6. D.C. also boasted the highest percentage of women of any state or similar jurisdiction, hitting 52.3 percent in 2012.

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