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Summer Months Bring Increased Risk Of Traffic Fatalities Involving Teen Drivers

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Many teen drivers admit that they are often distracted while driving.
Robert F. Bukaty
Many teen drivers admit that they are often distracted while driving.

The next three months will be especially dangerous for young drivers and passengers.

Whenever a teen driver is involved in a vehicle crash, there's a 75 percent chance it will be that teen's fault, according to a study released by State Farm Insurance. Another report released yesterday by the Ford Motor Company says two-thirds of the teens it interviewed admitted to being distracted while driving; the distractions included loud music, texting and talking on mobile phones.

"Be careful on the roads. Don't use your phones will on the road. Just try and focus on driving and getting from point A to point B because all the things you need to do can wait until you get home or to a safer place," said 15-year-old Tonya Burge, who is a traffic safety advocate at her high school.

That advice is even more important now that the weather has heated up. The number of traffic deaths involving teens doubles during the summer months according to federal data. The last weekend in June, the Fourth of July weekend and the final weekends in August are especially deadly.

Using a cell phone while driving is against the law in D.C., Maryland and Virginia.

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