NPR : News

Filed Under:

With Nod To 'Texts From Hillary' Guys, Clinton Joins Twitter

"Thanks for the inspiration @ASmith83 & @Sllambe - I'll take it from here... #tweetsfromhillary"

With that bit of social media swagger on Monday, @HillaryClinton joined Twitter.

Her shout-out is to Adam Smith and Stacy Lambe, the guys who last year started a meme by taking a photo of Clinton — in sunglasses and looking at her mobile device — and paring it with "texts from Hillary." They were often funny responses she supposedly sent to other famous folks' messages.

An example:

President Obama: "Hey Hil, Whatchu doing?"

Clinton: "Running the world."

Now Clinton is using that "texts from Hillary" photo on her Twitter page, And she's describing herself there this way:

"Wife, mom, lawyer, women & kids advocate, FLOAR, FLOTUS, US Senator, SecState, author, dog owner, hair icon, pantsuit aficionado, glass ceiling cracker, TBD ..."

Three translations:

-- FLOAR = first lady of Arkansas.

-- FLOTUS = first lady of the United States.

-- TBD = 2016 presidential contender?

Note: In its first hour, @HillaryClinton attracted more than 70,000 followers, perhaps in part due to a "welcome tweet" from @billclinton.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit


'Not Without My Daughter' Subject Grows Up, Tells Her Own Story

"Not Without My Daughter" told the story of an American mother and daughter fleeing Iran. Now that young girl is telling her own story in her memoir, "My Name is Mahtob."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

President Obama says the U.S. must lead the charge to reduce burning of fossil fuels. But American lawmakers are divided on limiting carbon emissions and opponents say they'll challenge any new rules.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.