D.C. Moves To Modernize Birth Certificate Laws To Help Transgender Residents | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Moves To Modernize Birth Certificate Laws To Help Transgender Residents

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D.C. is poised to modernize its birth certificate laws to help transgender residents.

On Wednesday a D.C. Council committee approved a proposal to make it easier for a transgender person to get a new birth certificate reflecting their proper gender. It would also get rid of a provision that requires District residents who have had their names legally changed from publishing notices in local newspapers, a move advocates for the transgender community say can lead to outing a person.

The bill is named after JaParker Deoni Jones, a transgender Ward 7 resident who was murdered in Northeast D.C. in February 2012. Her death sparked an outcry of support and raised awareness about hate crimes targeting the transgender community.

The measure heads to another committee and then on to the full council for a vote. Twenty-three states have adopted similar measures.

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