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Top D.C. Parking Ticket? Expired Meter, Of Course

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Don't overstay that parking meter, because D.C. will get you.
Kipp Baker: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrpixure/3135421163/
Don't overstay that parking meter, because D.C. will get you.

D.C. issued 1.8 million tickets to motorists last year, of which 750,000 were parking tickets. But which parking violations were the most ticketed?

Leading the charge were tickets for drivers who overstay their parking meters—322,000 tickets were handed out for that violation. The second-most common ticket was for motorists who stayed longer than the two hours allowed in most residential zones, with 190,000 tickets given.

Parking on the side of a street when street-sweepers are scheduled to pass garnered almost 90,000 tickets for third place, followed by the 80,000 tickets handed out for drivers who failed to move their cars from lanes reserved for rush-hour traffic.

All told, D.C. took in $92 million in parking tickets in the 2012 fiscal year. This year D.C. started garnishing tax refunds of residents who had failed to pay parking tickets.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
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World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


What Information Do Intelligence Agencies Need To Keep U.S. Safe?

In the aftermath of the deadly terrorist attacks in Paris, NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Bruce Hoffman of Georgetown University about what information intelligence agencies need to keep the U.S. safe.

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