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Prince William Co. Drops Outer Beltway From Priorities List

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Opponents of the "Outer Beltway" have gotten the ear of the Prince William County board of supervisors.
Martin Di Caro
Opponents of the "Outer Beltway" have gotten the ear of the Prince William County board of supervisors.

The controversy over plans for a major new highway in Northern Virginia has led Prince William County's board of supervisors to drop the project from its priorities list.

The board removed the Bi-County Parkway from its transportation priorities list, specifically a 10-mile stretch of a multi-lane highway that would connect Rts. 66 and 50. County Board of Supervisors Chairman Corey Stewart says this will have no impact on the project's progress.

"First and foremost, it's important to understand this is a state-funded road, it will be a state-designed road and it will be a state-constructed road," Stewart says.

Stewart says grassroots opposition led the board to yank it from the county's priority list of road improvements.

"We did not want those other priority projects to get embroiled in the controversy surrounding this road," Stewart says.

The Bi-County Parkway remains in Prince William's long-range comprehensive plan, where it has been for decades.

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