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Komen Foundation Scraps 3-Day Breast Cancer Walk In D.C. And Six Other Cities

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The 3-Day walk saw lower participation and fundraising in recent years.
Photo courtesy of the Susan G. Komen Foundation
The 3-Day walk saw lower participation and fundraising in recent years.

The Susan G. Komen foundation is canceling what had been an annual event: the 3-Day Walk, saying it will not be held in the District in 2014.

Susan G. Komen, dedicated to education and research about the causes, treatment and search for a cure for breast cancer, says D.C.'s 3-Day is being cut because of economic uncertainty.

The walk, which invites survivors and their supporters to swarm the cities with pink t-shirts and banners, has seen participation fall in recent years. The foundation's Race for the Cure, which took place last month in D.C., attracted 21,000 people, down from 27,000 in 2012 and 40,000 the year before.

Fundraising has also suffered, with Susan G. Komen raising $5 million in 2011, but less than half that amount this year. Each participant in the walk is expected to raise $2,300. The foundation was embroiled in controversy last year when it cut funding for Planned Parenthood.

Washington isn't the only place whose event is being cut. The 3-Day is also not returning to Arizona, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Tampa and San Francisco next year. The 2013 walk, scheduled for October 11, will take place as planned.

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