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In Day Three Of Bradley Manning Trial, Analyst Unit Under Fire

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The first week of testimony has ended in the court martial of the Afrmy Pfc. Bradley Manning, accused of giving secret government documents to Wikileaks.

Defense attorney David Coombs managed to get at least two witnesses to suggest under oath that Manning and other analysts in his Iraq unit worked in an unusually casual manner.

Army Specialist Jihrleah Showman, Manning's team leader in Iraq, testified that many soldiers in that unit often spent working time walking movies or listening to music on government computers designated for classified material. She said that practice continued for the first three months of their deployment, until a brigade commander ordered them to stop.

Later, Coombs grilled another Manning supervisor, Chief Warrant Officer Kyle Balonek, on whether music was allowed on a secured network. After repeated questioning, he answered, "I dont know whether it was authorized or not."

For their part, prosecutors are revealing that the 25-year-old former intelligence analyst was properly trained to secure classified information, but ignored his agreement to protect it.

Manning faces 22 charges including aiding the enemy, which could put him in prison for life.

Later, Judge Denise Lind noted that all scheduled witnesses for the week had been called, so she ordered the court in recess until Monday. The trial resumes then at 9 a.m.

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