D.C. Ranks Sixth On List Of Nation's Best City Park Systems | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

D.C. Ranks Sixth On List Of Nation's Best City Park Systems

Rock Creek Park is D.C.'s biggest park, at over 1,700 acres.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035749109@N01/5088569525
Rock Creek Park is D.C.'s biggest park, at over 1,700 acres.

D.C.'s park system ranks among the ten best in the country, according to a new report from the Trust for Public Land.

The report put D.C.'s parks at sixth in the nation, behind first-place Minneapolis and New York, Boston, Sacramento, and San Francisco. D.C. has 7,679 acres of parkland—19.7 percent of the city's land—96 percent of residents live within a half-mile of a park. And while D.C. does boast a large urban park—Rock Creek Park, coming in at at 1,754 acres—it also has the smallest average parks, coming in at 0.67 acres.

The report also found that there are 1.7 playgrounds per 10,000 residents—many of which are being renovated under a $35 million city plan—and that D.C. spends just over $343 per resident on parks.

D.C. is an interesting situation relative to other cities, though—most of the parks within city limits are controlled by the federal government. All told, 6,776 acres of D.C. parks are federal, and only 688 acres are city-owned.

NPR

Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking'

Host Michel Martin speaks with the directors of the National Museum of African Art and the National Museum of the American Indian. Both institutions are celebrating important anniversaries this year.
NPR

The Epic 2,200-Mile Tour De France Is Also A Test Of Epic Eating

Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.
NPR

California Nurses Union Braces For Contract Battle

The largest union of nurses in California starts contract negotiations Thursday with Kaiser Permanente's hospitals. Talks went smoothly four years ago, but this round will likely be more contentious.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.