Rubber Ducky, You're (Not) The One. Hong Kong Quacker Spawns Others | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Rubber Ducky, You're (Not) The One. Hong Kong Quacker Spawns Others

Perhaps it was inevitable. Given the huge popularity of the six-story, yellow rubber ducky that's been bobbing around in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbour, companies in a number of mainland Chinese cities have decided to copy it.

New ducks have popped up in the central city of Wuhan, the ancient city of Xi'an, the northern port city of Tianjin and Hengdian, a town in Zhejiang province that is home to a massive movie studio.

The duck doubles have raised questions over copyright issues, according to China Daily.

When contacted by China Daily, the companies that set up the ducks in Tianjin and Wuhan "declined to reveal their motives, or say if they had the authorization to do so."

The newspaper adds:

"Li Jingjian, an intellectual property lawyer in Beijing, said the ducks may violate the rights of the designer or other entities holding rights to the original duck.

'Generally, if something resembles another thing and has made people believe that they are related, it can be seen as copyright infringement,' he said."

The man behind the original duck in Hong Kong, Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, told The Wall Street Journal that he had no copyright agreements with any of the knockoff duck-makers on the mainland.

"If people want the real duck, they have to come to me," he said.

While imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, Hofman said he wasn't at all amused by China's sudden overpopulation of giant ducks.

"I've always said the rubber duck is a yellow catalyst," he told the Journal. "Right now what it is showing is that there is a lack of trust in China, and that is an enormous problem."

As Mark Memmott has reported, Hong Kong's duck was temporarily deflated last month for maintenance.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Living Small In The City: With More Singles, Micro-Housing Gets Big

Single people represent the fastest growing category of households in the U.S. That's made small dwellings — from micro-apartments to stand-alone tiny houses, a niche force in the real estate market.
NPR

Don't Be Fooled By The Fishy Ingredients: This Burger Is Delicious

Chef Marcus Samuelsson has a ritual whenever he travels to a new place — ask the cabdriver, "Where do you eat?" When he did that on a trip to Barbados, he fell in love with a fish sandwich.
WAMU 88.5

Hogan Refutes Claims That His Charter-School Bill Is A Union Buster

More than half of the state's 47 charter schools are located in Baltimore, and Hogan believes making it easier for more to open there — and elsewhere in Maryland — would help close the widening achievement gap between white students and students of color.
NPR

FCC Approves New Rules Intended To Protect Open Internet

The Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines — 3 to 2 — to approve new net neutrality rules that would regulate access to the Internet more like a public utility.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.