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Reports: American Woman Gang-Raped In India

"Indian police say that a 30-year-old American woman has been gang-raped in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh," the BBC writes. "Police said that the woman had been attacked after she accepted a lift by a group of men in a truck in Manali, a resort town in the state."

The Associated Press adds that "the 30-year-old woman was picked up early Tuesday morning by men in a truck as she was hitchhiking back to her guest house after visiting a friend, police officer Sher Singh said. The three men in the truck then drove to a secluded spot and raped her, he said. She went to police and they filed a rape case."

Police are looking for the attackers.

As NPR's Julie McCarthy has reported for us, "the startling state of sexual violence in India" has sparked protests and outrage in Delhi and other cities across the nation. The case that has drawn the most attention is the gang-rape and murder of a 23-year-old woman who was attacked on a bus in Delhi last year.

But, as Julie has noted:

"Sexual assault is also prevalent in rural India, where unelected, all-male village councils influence attitudes toward women, and caste conflict contributes to violence against them."

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