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Hacker Adrian Lamo Gives Evidence In Trial Of Bradley Manning

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The computer hacker who alerted authorities about Bradley Manning's involvement in the leak of secret government documents testified at the soldier's court martial today.

Prosecution witness Adrian Lamo was on the stand for about half an hour, answering questions about his involvement with Manning, which began in 2010.  That's when the two began chatting online after Private Manning reached out to the former hacker, turned security analyst for support and advice about what to do with the secret government documents.

Manning sat quietly through the testimony and didn't react when Lamo walked to the stand.

On cross examination, defense attorney David Coombs asked Lamo if Pfc. Manning ever mentioned that he wanted to use the information to help the enemy.

After a protracted pause, Lamo answered, "Not in those words, no."

In earlier testimony, Lamo said he turned Manning in to the FBI because he believed the release of the documents held by the former intelligence analyst could endanger American lives. 

Testimony continues Wednesday in Fort Mead Maryland.

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