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Another Report Shows Home Prices Taking A Big Jump

One week after the S&P/Case-Shiller indices showed a 10.9 percent jump in U.S. home prices from March 2012 to March 2013 — the biggest year-over-year gain in that data since April 2006 — there's another report showing a similar jump in April.

CoreLogic, which collects data on real estate sales, says home prices were up 12.1 percent in April vs. April 2012. According to The Associated Press, it's the largest year-over-year increase in CoreLogic's data since February 2006.

Reuters notes that "prices have been gaining for over a year as the housing market turned a corner, helped by low interest rates, a pick up in sales and less available supply."

Economists watch home sales closely. They're a major indicator of consumer confidence. Also, when home sales rise, the ripple effects spread out through the economy as new owners buy furniture and appliances or put money into renovations and repairs.

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He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
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State Taxes, School Budgets And The Quality Of Public Education

Budget cutbacks have made it impossible for many states to finance their public schools. But some have bucked the trend by increasing taxes and earmarking those funds for education. Taxes, spending and the quality of public education.

NPR

Listen: 'Web Site Story,' NPR's Musical About The Internet — From 1999

Found in our archives: an Internet-themed remake of West Side Story from the dot-com bubble era. It begins with Bill Gates and features the sound of a modem but isn't as obsolete as you might expect.

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