D.C. Council Committee Rejects Food Truck Regulations | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Council Committee Rejects Food Truck Regulations

D.C.'s food trucks fought regulations proposed by the city, saying that they left too much discretion to city agencies.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/majunznk/8658641861/
D.C.'s food trucks fought regulations proposed by the city, saying that they left too much discretion to city agencies.

What's becoming one of the city's longest-running regulatory battles has just gotten a bit longer.

A D.C. Council committee today rejected a proposed set of regulations for the city's growing network of food trucks, sending them back to the drawing board and further delaying a process that dates back to 2010.

The regulations—already on their fourth draft—were submitted to the council by the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs for an up-or-down vote, but during today's hearing Council member Vincent Orange (D-At Large) said that standing concerns with certain provisions left him and his colleagues little choice but to reject them in their entirety.

Under the proposed regulations, food trucks would be allowed to vend for longer periods of time in highly sought-after downtown locations, but spots in those areas—designated as "Mobile Vending Zones"—would be assigned by lottery. Food trucks not in the zones would have to stay at least 500 feet away, and would not be able to vend in locations where there isn't 10 feet of unobstructed sidewalk.

While city officials said the rules properly balanced the interests of food trucks and traditional brick-and-mortar restaurants by offering the food trucks over 150 spots throughout the city to vend, food truck operators worried that too much about how those spots would be doled out would be left to the discretion of government agencies. The food trucks mounted a social media-led public relations campaign against the regulations, and in a seven-hour hearing earlier this month convinced various legislators that they should be rejected.

Orange said today that he would seek to introduce emergency legislation to allow the council to tweak parts of the rules, instead of only being able to approve or disapprove them. "We are close to a solution," he said, noting that his concerns were limited to specific provisions of the regulations.

Council member Jim Graham (D-Ward 1) joined Orange and two other colleagues in unanimously rejecting the regulations, but also expressed hope that the council and city officials could soon come to a resolution.

"This is the longest-running movie on the council, and we're fed up with it," he said.

NPR

Not My Job: Travel Guru Rick Steves Gets Quizzed On Steve Ricks

Since we specialize in asking people things they know nothing about, we've decided to ask Rick Steves three questions about the people out there in the world who have his name, but reversed.
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Texas Gubernatorial Candidates Go The Border To Court Voters

Republicans have won every statewide office in Texas for 20 years, but the growing Hispanic population tends to vote Democrat, and the GOP's survival may depend on recruiting Hispanic supporters.
NPR

Tech Week: Smartphone Privacy, Cyberstalking, Alibaba's Big Debut

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba makes the biggest debut on the NYSE ever. The details, and the other tech stories that piqued our interest, are in this week's roundup.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.