Virginia Business Leaders Rally Behind 'Outer Beltway' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Business Leaders Rally Behind 'Outer Beltway'

Play associated audio

At a news conference in Manassas on Thursday, business leaders responded to what they view as a dishonest campaign by opponents of the "outer beltway," a new north-south corridor being backed by Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell.

"They are really designed to scare folks off from the many benefits this road will bring. There has been less than a fair and open conversation about the many attributes of the bi-county parkway project," said Tony Howard, the president of the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce. "We can advocate a message of reducing congestion in our region, of accommodating the substantial growth we know we are going to see. Our two communities brought in 250,000 new residents in the last ten years."

Future job and population growth in the Dulles area, say supporters, necessitates more north-south lanes, even though state data show significantly more traffic volume on Northern Virginia's east-west routes. The new roadway is expected to cost $1 billion.

"Loudoun and Prince William County are no longer bedroom communities exclusively. They are now true employment centers," said Howard. "We know with the growth of the commercial tax base in our respective communities that there is going to be ever increasing demand for north-south connectivity."

"The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments projects that much of the region's future population and job growth will occur in the adjacent communities to Dulles," said Rob Clapper, the president of the Prince William Chamber. "At the end of the day this road is about improving the quality of life throughout all of our communities. There are things it is targeted to do, specifically untangling the region's transportation mess."

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.