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14th Street Could Reopen Friday After $2 Million Of Work To Fix Sinkhole

The sinkhole was discovered last week, and $2 million worth of repairs could wrap up this week.
WAMU/Armando Trull
The sinkhole was discovered last week, and $2 million worth of repairs could wrap up this week.

D.C. officials said today that a sinkhole that has closed a stretch of 14th Street NW between Pennsylvania and New York Avenues could reopen to traffic as early as Friday, after repairs that are estimated to cost $2 million.

The sinkhole was detected last week and closed off most of 14th Street to traffic, though on Thursday one lane was opened up to southbound traffic. Crews have been working around the clock to repair a 114-year-old sewer line, fill the hole and repave the roadway, work that could be completed by the end of the week.

At a press conference at the intersection this afternoon, officials with D.C. Water said that an investigation had found that the sinkhole may have been caused by water seeping into the roadway instead of into a sewer line; a misplaced manhole cover may have been to blame.

Until the work is completed, lane closures will remain in effect, and no northbound traffic will be allowed on 14th Street between Pennsylvania and New York Avenues.

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