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Red Cross Offers Ways To Help Victims Of Oklahoma Tornado

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As rescue and recovery efforts press on in the area of Oklahoma devastated by a massive tornado, the local Red Cross is offering ways to help victims and locate friends and family.

Rescue personnel say it's still unclear how many residents in and around Oklahoma City have been displaced by this week's tornados. Many may have made their way to shelters in other neighboring communities but are still unable to make contact with loved ones in other parts of the country. 

Cheryl Cravats of the Red Cross National Capitol region says if you're having trouble locating anyone in the area hit by the tornado, go to their website and register for Safe and Well.

"That's a way for individuals who've been in harm's way to list themselves as safe and well, it's also a way for people who are concerned about their loved ones who live in Oklahoma to check to see if that person is safe," she says.

Cravets says you can also text "Red Cross," all one word, to 90999 to make a $10 contribution.

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