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Nation's Midsection Braces For More Severe Storms

There's no relief today for folks in the nation's midsection.

Tornadoes on Saturday in Kansas and surrounding states were followed by more twisters in Oklahoma on Sunday — including one that leveled a mobile home park in Shawnee, killing a 79-year-old man in the process. (Update at 11:10 a.m. ET: A second person in Oklahoma has died from storm-related injuries, The Associated Press reports.)

Severe weather will pummel states from Texas to the upper Great Lakes again on Monday.

The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center warns that:

-- It expects severe thunderstorms and possibly tornadoes in "far north Texas ... southern, central and eastern Oklahoma ... southern Missouri ... far southeast Kansas ... [and] northwest Arkansas."

-- "Severe storms are also possible from the upper Mississippi Valley and upper Great Lakes to central Texas."

The Weather Channel adds that things won't be much better in coming days:

"Tuesday — Additional severe thunderstorms are possible as the system advances slowly to the east from eastern Texas northeastward to the Middle Mississippi Valley and southern Great Lakes. Though isolated tornadoes will be possible, the main threats will be large hail and damaging winds.

"Wednesday -- Parts of the eastern Great Lakes and Upper Ohio Valley are at risk for damaging wind gusts and large hail."

The Oklahoman reports from Carney, Okla., on what it was like when one of the twisters tore through Sunday:

-- "Janee Keiser said she, her mother, her daughter and two granddaughters hid in a cellar while a tornado destroyed their home.

" 'It's gone — all the buildings, all the cars,' Keiser said. 'It took the garage, the barn, the shed — it took it all ... But we're all fine and that's the most important thing. The other stuff can be rebuilt.' "

-- " 'It sounded like an earthquake,' said Steele Jones, another Thornbrooke Village resident."

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