Immigration Officers' Union Will Oppose Senate Bill | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Immigration Officers' Union Will Oppose Senate Bill

The union that represents 12,000 officers who process immigration applications said they will oppose a bipartisan bill that seeks to overhaul the nation's immigration policies.

As Fox News reports, The National CIS Council is the second union to oppose the bill being discussed in Congress. The National ICE Council, which represents Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, has expressed its opposition to the bill for a while now.

Fox reports:

"Kenneth Palinkas, president of the National Citizenship and Immigration Services Council, said his union was never consulted by the group of bipartisan lawmakers writing the bill, which he claims was written with special interests in mind and fails to address 'some of the most serious concerns the USCIS Council has about the current system.' ...

"Palinkas says the bill doesn't address the pressure he claims is put on adjudication officers to rubber stamp applications instead of conducting diligent case reviews. He says it fails to fix the 'insurmountable bureaucracy' which often prevents USCIS officers from contacting and coordinating with ICE agents in cases that should have their involvement, and doesn't do enough to address the problem of student visa overstays."

Essentially, Palinkas told Politico, USCIS has been turned into "an approval machine."

"The culture at USCIS encourages all applications to be approved, discouraging proper investigation into red flags and discouraging the denial of any applications," Palinkas said.

The Hill reports that the bill is now being marked up in the Senate Judiciary Committee. "Republicans in the Gang of Eight [sided] with the Democratic panel majority to defeat a number of amendments which could have jeopardized the fragile bipartisan compromise," The Hill reports.

Politico reports that the opposition from the National CIS Council is a boost to the National ICE Council, which until now had been the lone voice of opposition among enforcement unions.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Novel Explores A Time When A Woman Might Not Live To Meet Her Child

Katy Simpson Smith's novel, set during the American Revolution, was inspired by her research on mothers in the South. "Death was sort of the specter that haunted every aspect of life," she says.
NPR

Nestle Nudges Its Suppliers To Improve Animal Welfare

The world's largest food company is requiring all of its suppliers of dairy, meat, poultry and egg products to comply with tighter animal welfare standards. Animal rights groups applaud the move.
NPR

Week In Politics: James Foley And Ferguson

Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
NPR

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.