NPR : News

A Lucky Winner In Florida Could Be $590.5 Million Richer

If you bought a Powerball ticket in Zephyrhills, Fla., sit down and look at these numbers:

10, 13, 14, 22, 52 and 11.

As the AP reports, lottery officials believe only one ticket matched all six numbers in yesterday's Powerball drawing with a record $590.5 million jackpot.

"This would be the sixth Florida Powerball winner and right now, it's the sole winner of the largest ever Powerball jackpot," Florida Lottery executive Cindy O'Connell told the AP. "We're delighted right now that we have the sole winner."

CNN reports:

"The jackpot has a cash value of $376.9 million.

"The largest lottery jackpot in U.S. history was $656 million in theMega Millions game in March 2012. That was split by three tickets sold in Illinois, Kansas and Maryland.

"If there had been no winner in Saturday's Powerball, the jackpot would have shot up to $925 million for Wednesday's drawing, according to Kelly Cripe, spokeswoman for the Texas Lottery, which is part of the multistate lotteries."

We don't know about you, but if we were holding the winning ticket, we'd be following in the footsteps of Toronto's Maria Carreiro.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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