A Lucky Winner In Florida Could Be $590.5 Million Richer | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

A Lucky Winner In Florida Could Be $590.5 Million Richer

If you bought a Powerball ticket in Zephyrhills, Fla., sit down and look at these numbers:

10, 13, 14, 22, 52 and 11.

As the AP reports, lottery officials believe only one ticket matched all six numbers in yesterday's Powerball drawing with a record $590.5 million jackpot.

"This would be the sixth Florida Powerball winner and right now, it's the sole winner of the largest ever Powerball jackpot," Florida Lottery executive Cindy O'Connell told the AP. "We're delighted right now that we have the sole winner."

CNN reports:

"The jackpot has a cash value of $376.9 million.

"The largest lottery jackpot in U.S. history was $656 million in theMega Millions game in March 2012. That was split by three tickets sold in Illinois, Kansas and Maryland.

"If there had been no winner in Saturday's Powerball, the jackpot would have shot up to $925 million for Wednesday's drawing, according to Kelly Cripe, spokeswoman for the Texas Lottery, which is part of the multistate lotteries."

We don't know about you, but if we were holding the winning ticket, we'd be following in the footsteps of Toronto's Maria Carreiro.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

High Tea, Afternoon Tea, Elevenses: English Tea Times For Dummies

It's easy to get overwhelmed by the English and their social tea traditions. What time are they each at, anyways? But don't fret. The Salt is here to offer guidance.
NPR

Communities Get A Lift As Local Food Sales Surge To $11 Billion A Year

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says local food is growing quickly from a niche market into something that's generating significant income for communities across the country.
NPR

Chris Christie Becomes 14th Republican Presidential Candidate

With New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the race, there are now 14 Republican candidates for president. Two more are expected to join by the end of July.
NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.