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Residents Ordered To Vacate Site Of Possible Fort Washington Casino

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A new $800 million casino could be built on this site in Ft. Washington.
WAMU/Elliott Francis
A new $800 million casino could be built on this site in Ft. Washington.

Developers of a planned $800 million casino in a Fort Washington neighborhood hope to expand the economic development created by nearby National Harbor.

The 22-acre parcel on the corner of Old Fort Road and Indian Head Highway is being developed by Parx Casino, owner of one of the largest gaming centers in Pennsylvania. Much like MGM Resorts International and Penn National Gaming, Parx has submitted a bid for a license to build a casino in the county, the sixth in the state.

Former Maryland delegate Darryl Kelly, an attorney who represents Parx, says the development could enhance the local economy. "We're right next to the Broad Creek historic district, and it would be a wonderful opportunity for Broad Creek to get some recognition. This would put some of the economic development further down Route 210 and hopefully will provide economic development in that area," he says.

The proposed development is expected to create more than 5,000 jobs and generate more than $400 million dollars of tax revenue for Prince George's County and the state.

Meanwhile, about a dozen families who rented homes on this parcel are being forced to vacate to make way for the development. Tammy Bland used to live here. "It's gonna be weird coming to play slot machines here, where we lived so long," she says.

State officials haven't yet granted a license for the new casino, nor have developers given a date of completion for the proposed gaming complex if they do get the license.

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