Top Stories: Jolie's Mastectomy; IRS's Targeting Of Groups | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Top Stories: Jolie's Mastectomy; IRS's Targeting Of Groups

Good morning.

Our early headlines:

-- Actress Angelina Jolie Shares Story Of Her Double Mastectomy.

-- Russian Security Service Claims To Have Uncovered CIA Agent.

-- Afghan Taxes Weigh Heavily On U.S. Contractors, Report Says.

-- Book News: Amazon Debuts Its Virtual Currency.

Other stories of the morning:

-- "IRS Officials In Washington Were Involved In Targeting Of Conservative Groups." (The Washington Post)

-- Associated Press Blasts Justice Department's Search Of Reporters' Phone Records. (Morning Edition)

-- Cleveland Kidnappings Suspect Was Previously Accused, But Not Formally Charged, With Abusing Common-Law Wife And Threatening Neighbors. (The Plain Dealer)

-- New Orleans Police Identify One Suspect In Mother's Day Shooting That Injured 19. (The Times-Picayune)

-- "Comfort Women" Were "Necessary" During World War II, Prominent Japanese Politician Says. (BBC News)

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