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October Trial Date Set For Virginia Executive Chef Case

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A Richmond judge is setting a new hearing in a politically-charged case that is overshadowing the race for governor.

Circuit Judge Margaret Spencer is setting trial dates as well as modifying a gag order in the embezzlement case against a former Virginia Executive Mansion chef.

The judge set a July 8 hearing date for motions, including one by Todd Schneider's lawyer to dismiss the four-count indictment. The trial, originally set for July, has now been pushed back to mid-October, right before the election for governor.

The judge also granted defense attorney Steve Benjamin's request to modify a gag order to allow attorneys to correct public misinformation as long as the defense and prosecution agree. Benjamin said the gag order prohibited him from keeping incorrect information about Schneider out of an Associated Press story.

After the hearing, Benjamin said he couldn't yet disclose the information in question.

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