NPR : News

Filed Under:

'I Hope He Rots,' Says Brother Of Cleveland Kidnap Suspect

Calling his brother a hateful monster, Onil Castro has told CNN he hopes Ariel Castro "rots in that jail."

"I want him to suffer," he said of Ariel, the 52-year-old man accused of holding three young women captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade — years in which Ariel Castro allegedly raped them repeatedly and subjected them to other physical and mental torment.

Onil and Pedro Castro, another brother, were both taken into custody along with Ariel one week ago. Victim Amanda Berry's cries for help had alerted neighbors and brought police to Ariel Castro's home, where officers also found her 6-year-old daughter (fathered by Ariel Castro) and two other young women who had been missing for about 10 years: Michelle Knight and Gina DeJesus.

Both Onil, 50, and Pedro, 54, were later released by authorities. Prosecutors said there was no evidence the men knew the women were inside their brother's home and that there's no evidence the two brothers played any part in the women's disappearances or captivity.

On an interview CNN broadcast Monday morning, Pedro Castro said he wants the world to know that "I had nothing to do with this and I don't know how my brother got away with this." On the occasions when he was in Ariel's home, Pedro said, he was never invited to go beyond the kitchen. Either a radio or a TV was always playing in the kitchen, he said, and he never heard any other sounds in the house.

Onil Castro said he feels like "a walking corpse right now" because of the attention and shame the case has brought to his family. He added that he had "absolutely no idea that this horrific crime was going on."

CNN has posted video of its interview here.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit


'Welcome To Where We From': Chicago Through The Eyes Of A Poet

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Chicago poet Nate Marshall, who reflects on this week in Chicago and read his poem "Out South."

How Long Can Florida's Citrus Industry Survive?

The USDA recently stunned growers when it projected the smallest orange harvest for Florida in more than 50 years. The culprit: A tiny insect that's killing off the state's trees — and industry.

Snapshots 2016: Trump's Message Resonates With A Master Cabinet Maker

From time to time during this election season we'll be introducing you to ordinary people that our reporters meet out on the campaign trail. Today: a snapshot from a Donald Trump rally in New Hampshire.

Someday A Helicopter Drone May Fly Over Mars And Help A Rover

NASA is building a 2-pound helicopter drone that would help guide the vehicle on the Red Planet's surface. That way, the rover wouldn't need to wander as much to find its way around.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.