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Seth Meyers Named Host Of NBC's 'Late Night'

Comedian Seth Meyers will replace Jimmy Fallon on NBC's Late Night, the network announced Sunday.

Meyers, the longtime SNL cast member who anchors the show's "Weekend Update" segment, will take the 12:35 a.m. segment from Fallon, who's replacing Jay Leno as host of the Tonight show.

The New York Times reports:

"NBC made the appointment, which had been widely expected, one day before Mr. Meyers was to be introduced to advertisers at NBC's presentation of its new programming lineup at Radio City Music Hall in Manhattan.

"The assignment will keep Mr. Meyers under the production leadership of Lorne Michaels, who will continue to serve as executive producer of Late Night as well as serving in the same position on Mr. Fallon's Tonight Show as it moves to New York. (And of course, he will remain in charge of SNL.)"

Meyers acknowledged the appointment announced on Mother's Day, by thanking Lorne Michaels and his own mom.

The Times reports both Meyers and Fallon are expected to start their new shows "around the time of NBC's coverage of the Winter Olympics from Russia next February."

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