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Free On Mother's Day, Former Captives Ask For Time, Privacy

The three women who were rescued from years of captivity in a house in Cleveland released a statement on this Mother's Day to let their supporters know that they're glad to be home. They also asked for privacy and time to reconnect with their families.

Attorney Jim Wooley read short statements from Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight, in which they expressed their gratitude "for the generous assistance and loving support of their families, friends, and the community."

They also thanked law enforcement agencies.

"I'm so happy to be home and want to thank everybody for all your prayers," DeJesus wrote. "I just want time now to be with my family."

"Thank you so much for everything you're doing and continue to do," Berry wrote. "I am so happy to be home with my family."

"Thank you to everyone for your support and good wishes," Knight wrote, "I am healthy, happy and safe and will reach out to family, friends and supporters in good time."

The women were freed Monday, after Berry seized a moment of opportunity — and neighbors answered her calls for help.

The man accused of abducting the women and holding them captive, Ariel Castro, faces charges of kidnapping and rape, in addition to other crimes.

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NPR

'The Innocent Have Nothing To Fear' Echoes Real-Life Republican Race

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
WAMU 88.5

How History Influences Diets In D.C. And Around The World

Kojo and chef Pati Jinich look at how history -- and famous names like El Chico, Azteca and even Fritos -- shaped modern Mexican-American cooking in the Washington region and beyond.

WAMU 88.5

Implications Of The Supreme Court's Immigration Ruling

Many undocumented immigrants are living in fear after a Supreme Court ruling effectively barred deferred deportation for 4 million people. What the ruling means for families across the country and how immigration policy is playing out in 2016 election politics.

NPR

Robot Helps 160,00 Motorists Beat Parking Tickets

Joshua Browder was fed up with parking tickets so he made a robot to help people challenge fines. The robot chats with people in London and New York, asks them what happened and writes an appeal.

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