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Free On Mother's Day, Former Captives Ask For Time, Privacy

The three women who were rescued from years of captivity in a house in Cleveland released a statement on this Mother's Day to let their supporters know that they're glad to be home. They also asked for privacy and time to reconnect with their families.

Attorney Jim Wooley read short statements from Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight, in which they expressed their gratitude "for the generous assistance and loving support of their families, friends, and the community."

They also thanked law enforcement agencies.

"I'm so happy to be home and want to thank everybody for all your prayers," DeJesus wrote. "I just want time now to be with my family."

"Thank you so much for everything you're doing and continue to do," Berry wrote. "I am so happy to be home with my family."

"Thank you to everyone for your support and good wishes," Knight wrote, "I am healthy, happy and safe and will reach out to family, friends and supporters in good time."

The women were freed Monday, after Berry seized a moment of opportunity — and neighbors answered her calls for help.

The man accused of abducting the women and holding them captive, Ariel Castro, faces charges of kidnapping and rape, in addition to other crimes.

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