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MGM Submits Bid For Las Vegas-Style Casino At National Harbor

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MGM wants to bring its casino to the National Harbor.
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MGM wants to bring its casino to the National Harbor.

One of the biggest gambling operations in the world is staking its claim on building a  Las Vegas-style casino resort at the National Harbor in Prince George's County. MGM Resorts today submitted an 800-page bid asking Maryland's Lottery Commission to grant it a casino license, saying that it's best-placed to build the right casino for the location.

"We put together world-class project resorts, casino resorts, and I think that's the operative phrase," says Lorenzo Creighton, MGM's president for the venture. Creighton promises the 20-acre project will be a boon for many local businesses. MGM's bid has the support of building magnate John Peterson, whose family owns National Harbor.

Penn National Gaming, another gambling powerhouse that owns Rosecroft Raceway in Fort Washington, has indicated it may also submit a bid to build a casino. Penn rolled snake eyes in its $40 million bet to derail gambling during last year's referendum, but has now opted to challenge MGM for the state's sixth casino.

All bids must be received by tomorrow.

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